Business Overview

Grocery stores sell food and other household items. Often called supermarkets, grocery stores are go-to sources for a home’s food needs. They similarly sell important kitchen utensils, disposable items, cleaning materials, candy, alcohol, soft drinks, and self-care items. Today’s grocery stores are great resources for many products, making them important local resources.

Who is this business right for?

Any individual who enjoys point-of-sale work, food, management, or finance can open a grocery store. The grocery business is competitive, but those who have a knack for making strong selling plans, capital-intensive business plans, or retail plans definitely have a shot. A grocery store owner should understand food very well, and they should have a passion for providing the best food around town.

What happens during a typical day at a grocery store?

A grocery store needs to stock a variety of products. They also have to help customers find, carry, and buy them. These products include ethnic foods, organic foods, frozen foods, and more. They must restock any perishable food before its expiration date. Additionally, the grocery store will need to stay competitive by offering low-priced options. Daily management includes cleaning, restocking, auditing, and selling.

What is the target market?

Preferred customers are locals. Because the grocery store business is competitive, small grocers thrive on local communities. Many shoppers choose to go to big-box stores like Walmart, Costco, Kroger, or Target for their food. Because of this, a new grocer will need to prioritize small communities, individual households, and college campuses by offering affordable food.

How does a grocery store make money?

Grocery stores generate most of their volume selling processed foods, but they also make money by offering fresh meats and produce, cleaning products, and alcohol.

What is the growth potential for a grocery store?

Grocery stores account for the largest share of food sales within the United States. In 2013 alone, grocery stores accounted for about 90% of the country’s overall food and beverage sales. The food retail industry is a low-margin, high-volume business. It has quite a bit of competition, and much of that competition is from well-established providers. If a small grocer doesn’t create a niche selling point, they may be outclassed by the big-box stores.