Business Overview

A sushi restaurant may offer other Japanese or Asian cuisine for its customers. It may also provide a special sushi bar so that interested customers can watch as their sushi is prepared. As a business, a sushi restaurant can scale up or down, serving as a small and modest eatery or as a fancier and more expensive restaurant.

Who is this business right for?

Obviously, this business is perfect for those who love sushi. It is also a good fit for anyone who has had restaurant management experience or other related restaurant experience that may help you in serving customers and otherwise running the shop.

What happens during a typical day at a sushi restaurant?

Despite its focus on sushi, the daily activities of this business are similar to those of any restaurant. Any given day is spent receiving and preparing food and drinks, coordinating employees, serving customers, and then cleaning the restaurant at the end of the night. You may use downtime you have to manage money and to advertise your business, especially on social media.

What is the target market?

It's a bit obvious, but your best customers will be those who love sushi. These are the customers who will best appreciate the diversity of your menu and the care with which you create the sushi. Additionally, these customers will typically be your best word-of-mouth advertisement.

How does a sushi restaurant make money?

A sushi restaurant makes money by charging customers for the act of preparing and serving sushi. Your restaurant may also make money by selling other dishes and/or selling alcohol.

What is the growth potential for a sushi restaurant?

The growth potential for this business is modest. As an industry, the sushi restaurant revenue grew only 1.2% between 2010 and 2014. However, American consumption of sushi grew 28% in that time, showing an increased public appetite for your restaurant's speciality.