Business Overview

You may sell your energy drinks through vending machines, restaurants, grocery stores, and even bars. Branding it in such a way as to emphasize your home town or state can help foster community spirit (similar to how the name of Gatorade helps honor the University of Florida where it was developed), and your choice of ingredients may allow you to emphasize the healthy effects this drink has on its consumers.

Who is this business right for?

If you have a background (or outright skill) in fields such as chemistry or health, it may help you to develop an energy drink that is tasty, safe, and helpful for consumers needing extra energy. Any past sales experience may also help you sell your new product to the various distributors in your region and, eventually, at an international level.

What happens during a typical day at an energy drink business?

Your exact daily activities will vary depending on how you start your business. If you work with a beverage development company, you will spend much of your days raising funds and collaborating with various professionals on everything from the exact ingredients of your drink to its logo, brand name, and marketing. You will also help facilitate practical details such as the inventory and shipment of your products. If you want to maintain more direct control over your product, you may decide to work with a co-packer that emphasizes research and development rather than a larger consulting company.

What is the target market?

The typical demographic for energy drinks is young men between the ages of 16 and 24. This is the legacy of the original marketing for companies such as Monster, although you can tweak your ingredients, branding, and marketing to target a less-served demographic and develop a better niche.

How does an energy drink business make money?

An energy drink company makes money through the distribution and sale of its own brand of energy drinks.

What is the growth potential for an energy drink business?

The growth potential for this business is modest. The Monster Energy Drink company recently experienced a lower sales bump than expected (8.9% rather than double digits) even after being bought out by marketing juggernaut Coca-Cola. However, it should be noted that the sales bump they received is still a good indicator of market health and, as mentioned earlier, the market certainly has room for more energy drinks catering to different demographics than Monster.